Driving research of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS),
Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS), Fibromyalgia and Post COVID .

Photo by King of Hearts
Wikimedia Commons

ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center
at Stanford University

Innovative, collaborative, open-data research to end Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS)

Core
Aims

What we hope to achieve

Our
Philosophy

Our fundamental philosophy

Science
Team

List of scientific collaborators

Research Studies

Current research projects

About the research center

The ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center (previously known as the CFS Research Center) at Stanford University was established in 2014 and is part of the Stanford Genome Technology Center. Both centers are directed by Ronald W. Davis, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics at Stanford.

Director: Ronald W. Davis, PhD

Throughout his career, Dr. Davis has conducted cutting edge, innovative, interdisciplinary research and technology development on cancer, immunology, genetics, infectious disease, novel drug development, and nanofabrication of diagnostic instruments. His emphasis has always been to increase accuracy and decrease cost. He has made significant contributions to research on numerous organisms, including bacteria, yeast, plants and humans.

Dr. Davis was the first to physically map the genome of any organism (1968).

Dr. Davis discovered a simple way to join together DNA from two organisms (“sticky ends”), and was the first to generate a hybrid DNA molecule that could replicate inside of cells (DNA cloning).

He developed most of the technology for the molecular genetics of yeast, which made it the most advanced model for conducting molecular genetics research.

Core Aims

Fundamental Philosophy

Current Studies

Extended big data study in families

Beginning in 2016, the aim of this study was to extend the Severely ill Patient Study (SIPS) and conduct a comprehensive “Big Data” analysis on ME/CFS patients and their families.

Read More →
T cells and Immunology

T cells and Immunology STUDY AIM Beginning in 2016, the aim of this study was to establish the role of T cells and the immune …

Read More →
Severely ill Patient

Severely ill Patient Study STUDY AIM The aim of the Severely Ill Patient Study (SIPS), which started in 2015, was to conduct a comprehensive “Big …

Read More →
Metabolic Trap

Metabolic Trap Study STUDY AIM Beginning in 2018, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis developed by Dr Phair that a crucial …

Read More →

Developing Technology

Developing blood-based diagnostic and drug screening technology

There is currently no biological test to diagnose Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS) and as a result, diagnosing patients is a lengthy and costly process, constituting a fundamental impediment in patient care. This lag in diagnosis also erects barriers to research, complicating patient recruitment and potentially engaging a heterogeneous sample of patients with only superficially similar conditions.

Dr. Davis’s team is dedicated to developing inexpensive tests that can be easily used in a doctor’s office.  Patients will be measured on multiple diagnostic platforms, enabling  comparisons of efficacy to determine what combination of platforms would be most useful  for diagnostic testing.

Mitochondrial Function Test

Mitochondrial Function Test TECHNOLOGY VALUE Demonstrates a significant difference between ME / CFS patients and healthy controls. LEAD INVESTIGATORS Julie Wilhelmy Ronald W. Davis, PhD UPDATES AND …

Read More →
Magnetic Levitation Platform

Magnetic Levitation Platform TECHNOLOGY VALUE This could be a very inexpensive and effective diagnostic test for ME/CFS. LEAD INVESTIGATORS Gozde Durmus, PhD Ronald W. Davis, …

Read More →
Red Blood Cell Deformability

Red Blood Cell Deformability in ME/CFS TECHNOLOGY VALUE This work has been accepted for publication in Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation and also has been accepted …

Read More →
Nanoneedle Diagnostic Tool

Developing Nanoneedle Technology TECHNOLOGY VALUE The technology will be optimized for easy clinical adoption and scaled up so that numerous FDA-approved drugs can be simultaneously …

Read More →

View our latest news

Ron Davis Update

“We are doing everything we can to continue progress on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS) during this time when we can’t go into the lab.

Read More »
To carry out this ambitious work, Dr. Davis has assembled a team of extraordinary scientists with expertise in a wide variety of areas directly relevant to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS) research.
 

Director

Ronald W. Davis, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine; Director, Stanford Genome Technology Center; Director, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center at Stanford University; Director, Open Medicine Foundation ME/CFS Scientific Advisory Board.

Collaborative Research Center / Stanford Genome Technology Center

Robert Phair, PhD

Wenzhong Xiao, PhD

Mohsen Nemat-Gorgani, PhD

Peidong Shen, PhD

Laurel Crosby, PhD

Michael Jensen

Fereshteh Jahaniani, PhD

Gozde Durmus, PhD

Julie Wilhelmy

Alex Kashi

Anand Ramasubramanian, PhD

Amit Saha, PhD

Layla Cervantes

Ami Mac, MD

David Kaufman, MD

Bela Chheda, MD

Chris Armstrong, PhD

Katrina Hong

Anna Okumu

Ashley Haugen

Collaborators

Juan Santiago, PhD

Eric Shaqfeh, PhD

Mark M. Davis, PhD

Michael Sikora

Mike Snyder, PhD

Craig Heller, PhD

Lars Steinmetz, PhD

Jonas Bergquist, MD, PhD

Rahim Esfandyarpour, PhD

Ron Tompkins, MD, ScD

Curt Scharfe, MD

Robert Naviaux, MD, PhD

William Robinson, MD

Lucinda Bateman, MD

Jennifer Frankovich, MD

Learn about Our Other OMF Funded Collaborative Research Centers

Stay Informed

Be the first to hear our research news.

Subscribe Now.

No thanks

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME / CFS) Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS), Fibromyalgia Leading Research. Delivering Hope.Open Medicine Foundation®

 

Averting a second pandemic:

Open Medicine Foundation leads groundbreaking international study of

Long COVID’s conversion to ME/CFS

AGOURA HILLS, CALIF.  — Open Medicine Foundation (OMF) is leading a large-scale international collaborative study investigating the potential conversion of Post-Acute Sequelae SARS-CoV-2 infection — more commonly known as Long COVID or Post-COVID Syndrome —  to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), a chronic, life-altering disease with no known cause, diagnostic test or FDA approved treatments available.

Up to 2.5 million people in the U.S. alone suffer from ME/CFS; the COVID-19 pandemic could at least double that number. An estimated 35 percent of Americans who had COVID-19 have failed to fully recover several months after infection, prompting many to call it “a potential second pandemic.”

OMF recognized a familiar health crisis emerging, one with eerie similarities to ME/CFS. This crisis presented a unique opportunity to understand how a viral infection — in this case COVID-19 — may develop into ME/CFS in some patients. The goal is to find targeted treatments for ME/CFS patients and ultimately prevent its onset in people infected with SARS-CoV-2 or other infections.

The federal government is only now investing in Post-COVID research, with no focus on its connection to ME/CFS. OMF has already engaged researchers for the largest-scale study of its kind, solely supported by private donors who have contributed over one million dollars to date. When fully funded, the five million dollar, three-year study will be conducted across the globe at OMF funded Collaborative Research Centers, led by some of the world’s top researchers and ME/CFS experts.

BACKGROUND

In a significant percentage of patients, infections preceded their development of ME/CFS.  For example, according to the CDC about one in ten infected with Epstein-Barr virus, Ross River virus, or Coxiella burnetti develop symptoms that meet the criteria for ME/CFS.

THE STUDY

The ability to follow the development of ME/CFS from a known viral infection is unprecedented to date and crucial to researchers’ understanding of the disease. The focus of this study is to find the biological differences between persons returning to good health after COVID-19 and persons who remained ill more than six months after infection and developed ME/CFS.  Understanding these alterations in key pathways can lead to groundbreaking discoveries including new biomarkers, drug targets, and prevention and treatment strategies.

###

About Open Medicine Foundation

Established in 2012, Open Medicine Foundation leads the largest, concerted worldwide nonprofit effort to diagnose, treat, and prevent ME/CFS and related chronic, complex diseases such as Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Post COVID. OMF adds urgency to the search for answers by driving transformational philanthropy into global research. We have raised over $28 Million from private donors and facilitated and funded the establishment of five prestigious ME/CFS Collaborative Research Centers around the world. To learn more, visit www.omf.ngo.

CONTACT:

Heather Ah San

Development and Communications Manager

1-650-242-8669

heather@omf.ngo